News

Cancers linked to Tobacco use make up 40% of all Cancers in US

Nov 10, 2016

Vital Signs reports that forty percent of cancers diagnosed in the U.S. may have a link to tobacco use. Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of cancer and cancer deaths. It causes more than lung cancer — based on current evidence, it can cause cancers of the mouth and throat, voice box, esophagus, stomach, kidney, pancreas, liver, bladder, cervix, colon and rectum, and a type of leukemia (acute myeloid leukemia).

Each year between 2009 and 2013, about 660,000 people in the U.S. were diagnosed with, and about 343,000 people died from, a cancer related to tobacco use, according to a new report by CDC. Three in ten cancer deaths were due to cigarette smoking, but progress has been made. Since 1990, about 1.3 million tobacco-related cancer deaths have been avoided.

“There are more than 36 million smokers in the U.S.,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “Sadly, nearly half could die prematurely from tobacco-related illnesses, including 6 million from cancer, unless we implement the programs that will help smokers quit.”

Quitting smoking at any age has health benefits, including reducing the risk of getting or dying from cancer. Quitting smoking improves the prognosis of cancer patients and reduces the risk of getting a secondary cancer (a cancer that occurs in a different organ) in cancer patients and cancer survivors.

 

Contact us if you need help quitting smoking. You can also get help quitting by calling 1-800-QUIT-NOW.